Television, Cinema, Video & On-Demand Audiovisual Services: The Pan-European Picture

This 5th edition of key trends is a selection of over 30 topics which, to the team of the European Audiovisual Observatory, appear to indicate the most significant trends affecting the European audiovisual market. The publication provides the usual mix of analysis and key data, extracted from the Observatory’s activities in 2019 involving reports and databases.

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Perspectives: A dialogue upon the question of value in film education

Speaking from two different perspectives, Alan Bernstein and Andrew Burn explore in “Perspectives: A dialogue upon the question of value in film education” published in Film Education Journal 2019 the role of value in film education, and film culture more widely. Their dialogue shows some common starting points but then different views (the first more related to practice, the second recognising the importance of theory). It may serve as inspiration both for film educators and other film professionals and practitioners as well, called upon to reflect on what constitutes the value of the films they make or propose.

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Reaching Young Audiences

The research project Reaching Young Audiences: Serial Fiction and Cross-Media Storyworlds for Children and Young Audiences (RYA) combines production and audience analysis when studying the current production and reception of film, TV and online fiction for children and young audiences. The project is based at the University of Copenhagen (with Associate Professor Eva Novrup Redvall as Project Leader) and runs from 2019–2024 (supported by Independent Research Fund Denmark).

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Survey on the Distribution of European Films for Children in Europe 2000 – 2004

They Come Around!
It is clear, when looking at the box office figures for films for children (or families) in various countries, that these films are well represented in the top ten of each country. These films, of course, are mainly the big American movies or sometimes a „national” production. Another generality we have often heard for many years now is that children’s films rarely pass the border of their country of origin. Here, we will take a look at the exact situation of these European children’s films and how they pass (or not) the borders.
by Felix Vanginderhuysen (12/2005)
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